Opening A Mystery

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The 2022 Anthony Award Winners

The 2022 Anthony Award winners were presented on Saturday night at Bouchercon. They were the third awards to be presented at the conference along with the Barry Awards and the Macavity Awards.

The Anthony Award is an annual award named after William Anthony Parker White, AKA Anthony Boucher. Boucher was an American author, critic, reviewer, and editor. He was also one of the founders of Mystery Writers of America.

The Anthony Award is one of the most prestigious awards in the world of mystery writers. The nominees are chosen by committee and the winners are voted for by the conference attendees

Here are the 2022 Anthony Award winners:

Continue reading

2022 Macavity Awards

Mystery Readers Journal

Mystery Readers International Presents the Macavity Awards

Here is a list of the 2022 Macavity Award winners that were announced at the opening ceremonies of Bouchercon 2022 in Minneapolis. The Macavity Awards are a literary award for mystery writers. They are nominated and voted on by the members of the Mystery Readers International. The award is named for the ‘mystery cat’ of T. S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats.

The 2022 Macavity Awards winners are:

Continue reading

The 2022 Barry Awards

Deadly Pleasures Magazine announced the winners of the Barry Awards at the Opening Ceremonies at the Minneapolis Bouchercon Thursday September 8, 2022.

In 1997, the editorial staff of Deadly Pleasures Mystery Magazine decided that, since one of their magazine’s goals was to search out and report on the best works being published in the field of crime fiction each year, it would be a natural fit to present an award for excellence. They named the award for one of their reviewers, Barry Gardner,  who passed away in 1996. The awards nominees are chosen by the nominating committee. The readers and subscribers vote for the winners.

 

Best Mystery/Crime Novel Continue reading

2022 Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Awards

The Killer Nashville Silver Falchion and Claymore Awards were given out this past weekend at the Killer Nashville International Writers’ Conference. It was three days of great classes, great panels, and great camaraderie. Clay Stafford and his gang has been putting on the conference since 2006 in an effort to bring together forensic experts, writers, and fans of crime and thriller literature. There were over 800 submissions to the Silver Falchion Awards this year.

You can find last year winners here.

Best Action Adventure Continue reading

The 2022 Shamus Awards Winners

Sam Spade. Mike Hammer. Kinsey Millhone. Some of our favorite characters have been Private Investigators. And a great way to keep up with the best in current PI stories is to follow the 2022 Shamus Awards winners and nominees.

Recently, the Private Eye Writers of America (PWA) announced the winners of the 2022 Shamus Awards. The Shamus Awards go to the best private eye novels and short stories published in the United States the previous year. The PWA defines a Private Eye as a person paid to investigate crimes who is not employed by a government agency.

The PWA and the Shamus Awards were founded by Robert J. Randisi. The first Shamus Awards were given out in 1982. On their website, they state that their goal is to make sure the genre continues to prosper and grow.

The 2022 Shamus Awards winners are:

Best PI Hardcover

             Family Business by S. J. Rozan (Pegasus)

 

Best Original Paperback

Every City is Every Other City by John McFetridge (ECW Press)

 

Best First PI Novel

       Lost Little Girl by Gregory Stout (Level Best)

 

Best PI Short Story 

          ” Sweeps Week” by Richard Helms (July/August)

 

2022 Shamus Award Winners @TimSuddeth @OpeningaMystery #Awards #Mysteries #MysteryReaders Click To Tweet

John Creasey

John Creasey is one of England’s and the world’s most prolific crime writers. He wrote over 600 acknowledged novels under at least

John Creasey's Gideon Fife

John Creasey’s Gideon Fire

twenty-nine pseudonyms. His first published book came out in 1932. His books continued to come out until after his death in 1973. In fact, when he died, he had a backlog of books he had just finished and was waiting to have publish. The last unique work written by him wasn’t published until 1979.

Can you imagine? That productivity blows me away. And it continued for over forty years. But it wasn’t just his output. It was also the range of the characters and plots that he created. One article about him claimed that the plots and characters of his stories were so different, it was like the series were written by twelve different writers.

Not only did he have tremendous output and a range of voices, he also wrote in several different genres: including science fiction, romance (under female pen names), and western novels.

And finally, he wrote with exceptional quality. His work in the 1950s and 60s rank among the finest crime fiction penned in the twentieth century.

So, let’s look at some questions about this amazing man. Continue reading

Mystery Readings for August

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Enjoying the summer

Welcome to Opening a Mystery, the August 2022 version. I hope you have a cool drink and a sea breeze to enjoy. I have some suggestions for mystery reading in August,

It’s funny how people don’t talk about being excited about the coming of August. Instead, we look at it as when school is about to start. How can we get one more vacation in before fall? And I’ve found that it doesn’t matter if the family has school kids or not.

But, living in South Carolina, I’m on to the sneakiness of August. By making us look beyond it to fall, it leads us to think cool weather is coming, right?

Not so fast. August is just as blazing as the rest of summer. And September usually slips in a surprise week of Indian summer.

Hopefully, this year it won’t be as hot as July, but don’t let it fool you. Summer never leaves without overstaying its welcome.

Lately, I’ve found some very interesting posts on some of my favorite websites.

First, over on Novel Suspects, Tess Gerritsen talks about her writing process, where she finds inspiration, and how she feels about her latest project of co-authoring a book with Gary Braver. Continue reading

Thrillers

In my earlier posts, I’ve looked at the differences in mysteries, suspense, and thrillers. Today, I want to take another look at thrillers: what they are, their components, and some of the different types.

Like any post I do on a literary genre, I feel I need to give some caveats. Just because a story is put in a certain genre doesn’t mean it has to have all the usual parts. Having all the parts doesn’t insure a great read. And missing some of the regular components doesn’t mean the story is inadequate. And once the critics feel they have a genre pegged, an author is going to come and put a unique spin on the category, blurring the lines once again. Continue reading

The Rabbi’s Harry Kemelman

The First of the Rabbi Small series

The Rabbi Slept Late

I am so excited about today’s post. Sometimes, when you go through your email list, you find a treasure. And that is how I feel about this post.

One of the goals here at Opening a Mystery is to introduce our readers to authors and series who have lost their popularity. Today’s post comes from the Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine website. (You can find their blog here.)  Arthur Vidro, a specialist on traditional mysteries, tells us about one of their writers whose stories they first published in 1947.

Harry Kemelman (b. 1908) was a contemporary of the Ellery Queen cousins (b. 1903) and John Dickson Carr (b. 1906). He published his first novel, Friday the Rabbi Slept Late, in 1964. That began his Rabbi Small series and earned him a 1965 Edgar Award for Best First Novel. His mysteries provide the reader a window into the Conservative Judaism culture. NBC made the story into a Made-for TV movie, Friday the Rabbi Slept Late, which aired on NBC in 1976, starring Art Carney as Chief Lanigan and Stuart Margolin as Rabbi Small.

Harry Kemelman started writing his novels late in life. His eleven best-selling murder mysteries starring Rabbi David Small began in 1964 (At age 56) and ended in 1996 (at age 88).

I hope you enjoy learning more about this talented writer. Click here for the article.

Learn more about Harry Kemelman's Rabbi Small series @OpeningaMystery @TimSuddeth #EQMM #Mysteries Click To Tweet

 

The Culinary Cozy or recipes to a kill for

The Culinary CozyFor some time, I’ve wanted to do an article about the culinary cozy mystery. These are cozy, and some not so cozy, mysteries that include food and recipes as a major part of the stories. But with all the entries in the culinary cozy genre, where would I even begin?

I’ve been a huge fan of the Hallmark Movies series with Hannah Swenson, based on the books by Joanne Fluke. The baker sleuth is always looking to bribe a potential witness with just the right cookie or brownie. That has the local police department eating out of her hand. (Pun intended.) Of course, I would have to look Continue reading

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