Better Lock the Door

Category: Reviews

Keith Roysdon’s History of True Crime

Early True-Crime Book

One of the most popular true-crime books.

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article about true crime books and their place in crime fiction. (You can find it here.)

Over on the CrimeReads blog, Keith Roysdon wrote a very interesting post entitled “A Brief History of the Rise—And Evolution—Of True Crime Books.” Roysdon is a former political journalist, has co-authored three crime-fiction books, and is writing fiction.

“A Brief History” goes into more details about some of the key books and authors in the true-crime genre. As the title suggests, Roysdon explains the changes that has taken place in the genre and how more changes are still taking place. And he gives us some of the major works throughout it’s history.

I recommend this article to get a better appreciation for true-crime books. It, also, shows what a great benefit many of these books have been.

You can get the link to “A Brief History of the Rise—And Evolution—Of True Crime Books” here.

Michael Connelly’s The Law of Innocence

Michael Connelly has become of the most successful current authors by selling over thirty novels and more than eighty million books. As a former newspaper reporter, he worked the crime beat at the L. A. Times and the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.

Connelly shot out of the gates in 1992, when his first novel, The Black Echo, won the Mystery Writer’s of America Edgar Award for the Best First Novel.

One of his latest novels is The Law of Innocence, focuses on Mickey Waller, known as the Lincoln Lawyer because he does much of his law practice out of his chauffeur-driven Lincoln Town Car. Waller, a defense attorney, is pulled over by the cops after he leaves a bar where his team had been celebrating a big win.

Being pulled over to a defense attorney is just part of the game the play with law enforcement. Since he had stopped drinking, it shouldn’t be a big deal, right?

Except for the client’s body stuffed in his trunk.

You can find my deeper review on this riveting book over at Killer Nashville website. (Get the link here.)

Slightly Murderous Intent on Killer Nashville

Slightly Murderous Intent by Lida Sideris

I enjoy both learning from the classic authors as well as finding new writers who are able to ever push the envelopes of the mystery genre. Last week , I was honored to have Killer Nashville publish my review of Slightly Murderous Intent by Lida Sideris. Slightly Murderous Intent is book four of the Southern California Mystery series.

Corrie Locke is a young attorney for a film studio. When her friends becomes targets of a hitman, she is determined to see he doesn’t succeed.

Sideris paints a beautiful picture of southern California, where she resides. Her first stint out of law school was to work as an entertainment lawyer for a film studio like her heroine.

If you like a strong and snarky female detective, this is a great series for you. You can read my full review here.

 

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Tim Suddeth