Opening A Mystery

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The 2021 Agatha Awards Winners

On July 17, the 2021 Agatha Awards were announced July 17 at the More Than Malice, the Virtual Malice Domestic Festival. For the second year, the award ceremony was virtual and not in person.

From the Malice Domestic website, the Agatha Awards “celebrate the traditional mystery, best typified by the works of Agatha Christie. The genre is loosely defined as mysteries that contain no explicit sex, excessive gore, or gratuitous violence, and would not be classified as ‘hard-boiled’.”

The nominees are suggested by everyone who has registered for or became a Friend of Malice Domestic by the end of the previous years. The five finalists in the six categories are chosen, then the attendees vote for the winners. Continue reading

Rex Stout’s Writing Career

Fer-De-LAnce by Rex STout

Rex Stout’s debut of Nero Wolfe

The creator of the characters of Nero Wolfe and his assistant, Archie Goodwin, Rex Todhunter Stout was one of the most popular and prolific crime fiction writers of all times. Upon his death in 1975, he had 57 books in print, more than any living American writer at that time. His books appeared in 22 languages and sold a total of 45 million copies as of 1975.

Rex Stout was born in 1886 in Noblesville, Indiana, to Quaker parents. The couple had nine children; Rex was the sixth. (So, how did he create a character like Nero who was such a recluse?) Continue reading

Keith Roysdon’s History of True Crime

Early True-Crime Book

One of the most popular true-crime books.

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article about true crime books and their place in crime fiction. (You can find it here.)

Over on the CrimeReads blog, Keith Roysdon wrote a very interesting post entitled “A Brief History of the Rise—And Evolution—Of True Crime Books.” Roysdon is a former political journalist, has co-authored three crime-fiction books, and is writing fiction.

“A Brief History” goes into more details about some of the key books and authors in the true-crime genre. As the title suggests, Roysdon explains the changes that has taken place in the genre and how more changes are still taking place. And he gives us some of the major works throughout it’s history.

I recommend this article to get a better appreciation for true-crime books. It, also, shows what a great benefit many of these books have been.

You can get the link to “A Brief History of the Rise—And Evolution—Of True Crime Books” here.

The 2021 Shamus Awards Finalists

Guy Toltl Kinman, Chairperson for the Shamus Awards, released the finalists for the 2021 awards. Categories include Best PI Novel, Best Original PI Paperback, Best PI Short Story, and Best First PI Novel.

The Private Eye Writers of America award the Shamus Awards for the best detective fiction genre novels and short stories of the previous year. They were first given out in 1982.

Robert J. Randisi founded the Private Eye Writers of America 1981 . According to its official mission statement, its two main goals are to support and further the private eye genre. Secondly, to elevate the PI genre from being a sub-genre of mystery to being its own genre.

They define a private eye as a private citizen who is paid to investigate crimes and not a law enforcement officer.

You can find the list of nominees here.

Michael Connelly’s The Law of Innocence

Michael Connelly has become of the most successful current authors by selling over thirty novels and more than eighty million books. As a former newspaper reporter, he worked the crime beat at the L. A. Times and the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.

Connelly shot out of the gates in 1992, when his first novel, The Black Echo, won the Mystery Writer’s of America Edgar Award for the Best First Novel.

One of his latest novels is The Law of Innocence, focuses on Mickey Waller, known as the Lincoln Lawyer because he does much of his law practice out of his chauffeur-driven Lincoln Town Car. Waller, a defense attorney, is pulled over by the cops after he leaves a bar where his team had been celebrating a big win.

Being pulled over to a defense attorney is just part of the game the play with law enforcement. Since he had stopped drinking, it shouldn’t be a big deal, right?

Except for the client’s body stuffed in his trunk.

You can find my deeper review on this riveting book over at Killer Nashville website. (Get the link here.)

2021 Anthony Awards

With so many mystery books coming out each month, how can you make sure you don’t miss the best ones? One of the best ways is to look for the books that are honored by other writers and readers. That is why I will be posting lists of nominees and winners of some of the top awards as they come out.

The Anthony Awards nominees have been announced for 2021. The Anthonys are given out each year at the Bouchercon, the Anthony Boucher Memorial World Mystery Convention. The awards are voted on by the attendees.

The awards are named after Anthony Boucher, an editor, writer, and reviewer for the New York Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. Boucher was one of the founders of the Mystery Writers of America in 1946. The awards have been given out since 1986 and are considered one of the top literary awards for mystery writers.

The 2021 conference will be held in New Orleans on August 25-29. The title for this year is New Orleans Blood on the Bayou Postmortem. Some of this year’s guests of honor include Michael Connelly, Steph Cha, and Craig Johnson.

You can see a list of the nominees here.

 

Does True Crime Fit In Mystery/Detective Fiction?

By Tim Suddeth

Police car at road block

Police car

True crime is a genre of literature that, at first glance, doesn’t seem to belong in a blog about mystery and detective fiction. But its influence on the other fiction genres and its relationship can’t be ignored.

Mankind has always liked telling the gruesome and lurid details of crime. I can picture Og, sitting by the campfire telling his clan the story about a murder, he thinks it was possibly committed by a banshee, that he had heard from his father or uncles. A true crime story contains just the right mixture of information that we might need for protection, yet it appeals to our baser natures.

True crime includes nonfiction literature, film, and podcasts in which the author examines an actual crime and details the activities of real people. It can be a case that is still in the papers, or a cold case that seems to have been forgotten. Often, the story follows the case from the discovery through the investigation and the legal proceedings.

The most important characteristic is that it is true; it actually happened in the way it is depicted, in the people involved, dates, victims, and villains. There may be some dialogue added and some speculations that are admitted, but it is based on unbiased fact. But finding facts without bias is hard to do if not impossible.

Most true crime stories involve murder, even though it makes up less that 20% of all crimes. The idea of actually murdering someone is so hard to believe that we want to get an idea of what drove the person to kill. What were they thinking? And were there signs that we should be aware of? Continue reading

2021 Edgar Award Winners

Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line

2021 Edgar Award winner for Best Novel

On April 29th, the Mystery Writers of America celebrated its 75th year and awarded the 2021 Edgar Awards. These awards highlight the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theatre.

If you are looking for a good book to read or to study as a writer, these are good options.

You can find a link to the winners here.

You can find a link to all of this year’s nominees here.

Slightly Murderous Intent on Killer Nashville

Slightly Murderous Intent by Lida Sideris

I enjoy both learning from the classic authors as well as finding new writers who are able to ever push the envelopes of the mystery genre. Last week , I was honored to have Killer Nashville publish my review of Slightly Murderous Intent by Lida Sideris. Slightly Murderous Intent is book four of the Southern California Mystery series.

Corrie Locke is a young attorney for a film studio. When her friends becomes targets of a hitman, she is determined to see he doesn’t succeed.

Sideris paints a beautiful picture of southern California, where she resides. Her first stint out of law school was to work as an entertainment lawyer for a film studio like her heroine.

If you like a strong and snarky female detective, this is a great series for you. You can read my full review here.

 

Evan Hunter Was Ed McBain

How do you replace such a prolific author as Erle Stanley Gardner? That was the question Pocket Books had to answer when the author of 80 Perry Mason novels had to slow down because of age. They needed an author who could give them the same type of output.

So, they turned to Evan Hunter, who signed a multi-book deal that turned into the 87th Precinct series under his pseudonym, Ed McBain. The 87th Precinct became one of the longest running crime series ever published, running from 1956 to 2005, and featuring over fifty novels.

Early Life

 

Salvatore Albert Lombino was born on October 15, 1926, in New York City. His family moved around while he was growing up. He spent part of his youth in East Harlem and then the Bronx. His family included several artists, so he took art classes as a child and planned to become an artist. He enlisted into the U. S. Navy, where he served aboard a destroyer in the Pacific. Part of his down time was spent drawing portraits of “everyone aboard the ship and all the smokestacks, torpedo tubes and depth charge racks. When there was nothing left to draw, I borrowed a typewriter . . .and wrote several stories and found I liked it.” Continue reading

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